Courses

  • 8 Lessons

    A TOUR OF EUCLID’S ELEMENTS

    For several millenia, Euclid’s Elements was considered the indispensable gateway to higher studies. Like St. Thomas’s Summa theologiae, the Elements is that rare work that is both an excellent textbook attentive to the needs of new students and one of the great masterpieces of geometry.

    This course will lead participants on a broad tour of the first ten books of the Elements, which encompasses all of Euclid’s plane geometry. Participants will get a taste of demonstrating prepositions, while seeing proofs for fundamental equalities concerning triangles, parallelograms, and circles. Then attention will be turned to Euclid’s treatment of measurement, similarity, and incommensurability. Discussions will center on understanding Euclid’s arguments & order, with comparisons to modern developments in mathematics.

    Dr. Andrew Seeley has decades of experience in leading discussions of great texts of all kinds, including original texts in ancient and modern mathematics and science.

  • 8 Lessons

    AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF LOGIC

    This course introduces logic as a liberal art, i.e., an art of things which are made in being known and known in being made.  Logic directs the fundamental acts of the human intellect—simple apprehension, composition and division, inference—in realizing what they make and know, the forms of discursive understanding: definition, judgment, and argument.

  • 8 Lessons

    FLANNERY O’CONNOR, WRITER, PROPHET, APOLOGIST

    This course will study the short stories of Flannery O'Connor. One or two stories will be assigned for each of the eight classes. We will also discuss the life and influence of Flannery O'Connor as one of the great and most-respected Catholic writers of the twentieth century. The short stories to be read include 'The River,' 'Good Country People,' 'Revelation,' 'Parker's Back' and 'Everything That Rises Must Converge.' The only text students need to acquire is The Complete Short Stories of Flannery O'Connor (Farrar Straus and Girioux).

  • 8 Lessons

    MILTON’S PARADISE LOST

    Join famed author, professor, and AMI Senior Fellow, Anthony Esolen for a deep dive into the great epic poem of the English Language, Paradise Lost. More details coming soon. This course will fulfill an elective requirement within the Magnus Fellowship.

  • 8 Lessons

    RENÉ GIRARD’S THEATRE OF ENVY

    René Girard argues that the 10th Commandment against coveting, or envy, explains every other sin in the Bible, starting with Adam and Eve coveting God’s knowledge of good and evil.  Overcoming that envy is at the heart of Christ’s Passion. Shakespeare, he argues, would agree.  To see what he means, this course will attempt to understand Girard’s theory of  “mimetic rivalry,” “triangulation” and scapegoating violence, by reading how he interprets Shakespeare’s major plays.  From “A Midsummer Nights Dream,” through “Julius Caesar” and “A Winter’s Tale”, we will use these plays to see the otherwise hidden connection between envy, sin, Christ’s crucifixion, and his Resurrection. 

    This course's seminar will feature Senior Fellows Patrick Downey and Tiffany Schubert.