Courses

  • 8 Lessons

    FRIENDSHIP AND FREEDOM IN LORD OF THE RINGS: PART III

    JRR Tolkien’s great work, The Lord of the Rings, continues to be prescient and relevant to our present situation.  Through the vehicle of a secondary world, Tolkien explores universal questions of the human person’s place in a world of contesting forces.  Tolkien examines the control of external, hostile forces over the human person and to what extent the person has freedom to respond.  Tolkien masterfully responds both to the modernist elevation and exultation of human autonomy and the postmodernist devaluation of the same by presenting a strongly Christian understanding of free will and the human person’s inherent dignity and worth.

  • 8 Lessons

    INTRODUCTION TO ECCLESIAL LATIN: Grammar, Prayers, Scripture 

    The course is a beginner's introduction to Ecclesial (/Church) Latin. Grammatical and syntactical points will be gradually covered while reading through some of the most well-known prayers, hymns, scripture passages, and writings of the Catholic tradition. 

  • 8 Lessons

    PHILOSOPHY OF MAN

    Building on Aristotle and St. Thomas's philosophical account of the human person, this class will focus principally on St. Thomas's teachings on man's natural and supernatural ends and the means proportioned thereto.  To achieve this goal, we will engage in an in-depth study of the questions 1-5 from the Prima secundae of St. Thomas's Summa theologiae.  And, to more fully make our own these great teachings, we will pursue a slow reading and discussion of Josef Pieper's Happiness and Contemplation.

  • 8 Lessons

    ROUSSEAU AND THE DIABOLICAL AND MORAL IMAGINATIONS

    This course explores the moral dimensions of the imagination through an examination of literature and philosophy. The aim of the course is to define and understand the concept of “imagination” and to be able to assess its role—for good or ill—in thought, action, and politics. Eighteenth-century philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau was a pioneer of the Romantic movement and helped to shape the heart and mind of the West, both politically and in more subtle, but no less profound, ways. This course seeks to uncover some of the ways in which Rousseau’s imagination serves as a touchstone for what has perhaps been the dominant moral sensibility in the West for the past two centuries.