INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT GREEK II

This is the second course in a (projected) four-course sequence aimed at equipping Fellows to master for themselves, at their leisure, original texts by classical authors, and to make their way through the Books of the New Testament and the Septuagint (the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures). Introduction to Ancient Greek I, led Fellows into a well-selected Greek vocabulary, and enough Greek grammar and morphology (conjugations of verbs, declensions of nouns and adjectives, including the present, and imperfect tenses active and middle/passive voices of the Greek verb) to parse and sight-read selected passages from classical authors and the New Testament. At the conclusion of Introduction to Ancient Greek, II, Fellows will have added additional vocabulary, the future and aorist tenses of the active and middle/passive verb, and associated syntax—enough Greek to begin essaying substantial passages from classical authors and the New Testament with help from, say, the Perseus word-tool.  Continued below...

Class begins on Tuesday May 28th, at 5pm Pacific (8pm Eastern), and continues for EIGHT Tuesdays. Last class will be on July 23rd.

...Continued from Course Description: At the conclusion of Introduction III, Fellows will have the fundamentals of complex Greek syntax—e.g., conditional and contrary-to-fact constructions—with verbs in the subjunctive and optative moods. Finally, with the conclusion of Introduction IV, Fellows will have sufficient Greek to “boot-strap” their way—with the aid of, say, Smythe’s authoritative Greek Grammar (which they will be capable of using)—through most classical or late antique authors. After a certain point, mastering ancient Greek means adding individual authors’ texts to one’s (growing) repertoire. AMI aims to put Fellows in that position at the conclusion of the sequence: 32 weeks of instruction in total.

TEXT: Maurice Balme & Gilbert Lawall, Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, Book I, 3rd ed., rev. James Morwood (Oxford University Press, 2016); ISBN 13: 978-0-19-060766-1.

Our text, Athenaze, vols. I – II, is justly celebrated for leading students steadily
and efficiently from simplified readings, through gradual grammatical and syntactical refinements, to original texts—and it introduces selected, readable originals as milestones all along the course of this development.

As in Introduction I, class meetings of Introduction to Ancient Greek, II, will be divided into two “hours” (separated by a ten-minute break), each dealing with one division of the two into which each chapter of Athenaze falls. Fellows will be invited to volunteer to parse and translate sections of the Greek narrative proposed for each week’s class. Adequate preparation? Spend an hour in study for each hour in class: recite readings aloud; write out Vocabulary on 3 x 5 cards (Greek on the front, translation on the back), and run through the whole collection once each week; write out English and Greek translations and compare them to the paradigms produced in class; in all things, note difficulties, RAISE QUESTIONS.

Complete keys to each weekly lesson’s grammar and translation exercises will
be posted after each class meeting for Fellows’ personal use.

Class Schedule - Introduction to Ancient Greek, II

Week One, 5/28
1st hour, Athenaze, pp. 156 - 157, 166 – 167, 173, Η ΠΑΝΗΓΥΡΙΣ [“The Festival”] (α) – (β): parsing and Greek – English translation of the on-goin narrative of Dicaeopolis and family, and of the story of Odysseus and Circe from The Odyssey.
2nd hour, Athenaze, pp. 157 – 160, 168 – 173: Present-Progressive Active Voice Particples of the verb “to be,” ω-verbs, εω- and αω- verbs; Greek-English, English-Greek translation exercises; 3 rd -declension nouns with stems in vowels/diphthongs, syntax of the genitive case, syntax of the article with adjectives/participles; Classical New Testament Greek: translation of a couplet from Simonides, and of Luke 6:31 – 33.

Week Two, 6/4
1st hour, Athenaze, pp. 183, 190, 192 – 193, 199, Ξ ΣΥΜΦΟΡΑ [“The Mishap”] (α) - (β), parsing and Greek – English translation of the on-going narrative of Dicaeopolis and family, and of the story of Odysseus’ loss of his companions from The Odyssey; Classical Greek, translation from Theognis; New Testament, translation of Luke 6:35 – 36.
2nd hour, Athenaze, pp. 176 – 181, review of familiar and preview of new verb forms; future tense (2nd principal part) active voice and middle voice verbs with sigmatic or asigmatic stems; verbs with deponent future future-tense forms; p conjugation and translation exercises with the future tense; pp. 194 – 201, morphology of verbs with nasal stems and asigmatic contract future forms; the irregular verb εἶμι; syntax of the future participle expressing purpose; Greek-English, English-Greek translation exercises; Classical Greek, translations from Menander, Archilochus; New Testament, Luke 5: 30 – 32.

Week Three, 6/11
1st hour, Athenaze, pp. 204 – 205, 217 - 219, Ο ΙΑΤΡΟΣ [“The Physician”] (α) - (β), 223: parsing and Greek – English translation of the on-going narrative of Dicaeopolis and family, and of the story of Democedes adapted from Herodotus’ Histories.
2nd hour, Athenaze, pp. 205 - 211: introduction to the aorist tense; formation of the second, aorist in the active and middle voices; discussion of aspect; formation of second, thematic, active- and middle-voice participles; list of common verbs with second, thematic, aorits; conjugation exercises, Greek-English, English-Greek translation exercises; pp. 219 – 224: formation of verbs with thematic, second aorists from unrelated stems; irregular accentuation of active-voice second aorist imperatives; rules of augmentation; English-Greek, Greek-English transltion exercises; New Testament translation, Luke 6:27 – 29.

Week Four, 6/18
1st hour, Athenaze, pp. 228 – 229, 234 - 235, 237 - 238, 242 – 243, ΠΡΟΣ ΤΟΝ ΠΕΙΡΑΙΑ [“To the Piraeus”] (α) - (β): parsing and Greek–English translation of the on-going narrative of Dicaeopolis and family; Classical Greek, Scholion on the 4 Best Things; New Testament Greek, Luke 15: 3 – 7; and the story of Colaeus discovery of Tartessus, adapted from Herodotus’ Histories.
2nd hour, Athenaze, pp. 227 - 231: formation of the sigmatic first aorist in the active and middle voice, indicative and imperative mood, with the participle, of ω-verbs and εω contract verbs; formation of ist aorist active and middle participles; conjugation and Greek-English, English-Greek translation exercises; 239 – 243: formation of asigmatic, first-aorist verbs with nasal and liquid stems in the active and middle voice, indicative and imperative moods, with the infinitive and participle; augmentation in compound verbs; Greek-English, English-Greek translation exercises; Greek Wisdom, translation of a saying of Bias of Priene.

Week Five, 6/25
1st hour, Athenaze, pp. 246, 257 - 258, 263 – 266, ΠΡΟΣ ΤΗΝ ΣΑΛΑΜΙΝΑ (α) - (β): parsing and Greek – English translation of the on-going narrative of Dicaeopolis and family; parsing and translation of the story of Xerxes forcing the Hellespont, adapted from Herodotus’ Histories; Greek Wisdom, saying of Solon; Classical Greek, fragment of Archilochus; New Testament Greek, Luke 21: 1 – 4.
2nd hour, Athenaze, pp, 247 - 521: formation of the imperfect/past progressive tense, active and middle voice, for ω-verbs, ε-contract verbs, α-contract verbs, and for the irregular verbs “I am,” εἰμἰ, and “I [will] go,”εἶμι; discussion of augment in irregular past-imperfect verbs; discussion of past-progressive aspect; conjugation exercise and Greek-English, English-Greek translation exercises; 258 – 262: syntax of relatice clauses, declension of relative pronouns; morphology of 1st -3rd declension adjective ταχύς, ταχεῖα, ταχύ; Greek-English, English-Greek translation exercises.

Recess for the Week of Independence Day, 6/30 – 7/6

Week Six, 7/9
1st hour, Athenaze, pp. 268- 269, 279, 282 – 283, 287 – 289, Η ΕΝ ΤΑΙΣ ΘΕΡΜΟΠΥΛΑΙΣ ΜΑΧΗ (α) - (β) [“The Battle at Thermopylae”]: parsing and Greek-English translation of the account of Thermopylae and of the Persians’ flanking of the Greek force, owing to treachery, adapted from Herodotus’ Histories; parse and translate Classical Greek, epigram of Archilochus and a stanza from Theognis; parse and translate New Testament Greek, Luke 10: 25 – 37.
2nd hour, pp. 270 – 274: introduction to comparison of regular and irregular adjectives, and to comparison of adverbs; syntax of comparative and superlative usages; exercises on translation of comparatives and superlatives, English-Greek and Greek-English; 284 – 286: declension of the demonstrative adjectives οὗτος, αὕτη, τοῦτο; ἐκεῖνος, ἐκείνη, ἐκεῖνο; ὅδε, ἥδε, τόδε; exercises on conjugations of the demonstratives, Greek-English translation, English-Greek translation, and the syntax of interrogative indefinite pronouns, adjectives, adverbs.

Week Seven, 7/16
1st hour, Athenaze, pp. 291, 298 – 299, 301 – 303, 307, Η ΕΝ ΤΗΙ ΣΑΛΑΜΙΝΙ ΜΑΧΗ (α) - (β) [“The Battle at Salamis”]: parsing and translating the narrative of the Persian naval defeat at Salamis; New Testament Greek, Luke 2: 1 – 14; parsing and translating the narrative of the Persians’ seizure of Athens, adapted from Herodotus’ Histories.
2nd hour, Athenaze, pp. 292 - 294: formation of athematic second aorists (βαίνω, βήσομαι, ἔβην; γιγνώσκω, γνώσομαι, ἔγνων; and ἔστην); Greek-English, English-Greek translation exercises; further 3rd -declension nouns in - εσ-; pp. 303 – 306, 308: formation of present-tense active and middle voice ο contract verbs in the indicative and imperative moods, with the infinitive and participle; declension of 2nd -declension contract nouns (example: νοο + ς  νοῦς, κτλ.); declension of n th ordinals; adverbial and conjunctive uses of ὥς and its compounds; Greek-English, English-Greek translations.

Week Eight, 7/23
1st hour, Athenaze, pp. 310 – 312, 319 – 320, 322 – 323, 324 - 326: ΜΕΤΑ ΤΗΝ ΕΝ ΤΗΙ ΣΑΛΑΜΙΝΙ ΜΑΧΗΝ [“After the Battle of Salamis”]: parsing and translating the narrative of the post-Salamis rise of Athens told to Dicaeopolis and Phillip; parsing and translation of the narrative of Xerxes’ post-Salamis withdrawal into Asia, adapted from Herodotus’ Histories; Classical Greek, translation for verses from Sappho and Simonides; New Testament Greek, translation of Luke 2: 15 – 20.
2nd hour, Athenaze, pp. 312 – 314: introduction to the passive voice in contradistinction to the active and middle; Greek-English, English-Greek translation exercises; pp. 321 – 322, 324: introduction to conjugations of verbs with athematic present-tense and imperfect-tense forms: δύναμαι, κεῖμαι, ἐπίσταμαι; Greek-English and English-Greek translation exercises.

About Instructor

Steven Cortright

Steven A. Cortright is a Professor in the Philosophy Department and Integral Program at St. Mary’s College of California where he has been teaching since 1977. A graduate of St. Mary’s College himself and the University of Notre Dame, Professor Cortright is the founding president of the Albertus Magnus Institute.

5 Courses

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Course Includes

  • 8 Lessons
  • Course Certificate